Lucian Freud! Born on this day in 1922.

Standard


Girl with a White Dog 1950-1
This picture shows the artist’s first wife when she was pregnant. The style of the painting has roots in the smooth and linear portraiture of the great nineteenth-century French neoclassical painter, Ingres. This, together with the particular psychological atmosphere of Freud’s early work, led the critic Herbert Read to make his celebrated remark that Freud was ‘the Ingres of Existentialism’.

The sense that Freud gives of human existence as essentially lonely, and spiritually if not physically painful, is something shared by his great contemporaries, Francis Bacon and the sculptor Alberto Giacometti. (Via Tate)

Writing about….Paestum or Poseidonia

Standard

The Doric temple of Hera, the wife of Zeus,  in Paestum, Italy, an outpost of ancient Greece.

The ceramic  ceremonial bust of the Goddess Hera. Classical period. Paestum,
Italy-Archaeological Museum of Paestum

 

The word ‘swastika’ is a Sanskrit word (‘svasktika’) meaning ‘It is’, ‘Well Being’, ‘Good Existence, and ‘Good Luck’. However, it is also known by different names  in different countries – like ‘Wan’ in China, ‘Manji’ in Japan, ‘Fylfot’ in England, ‘Hakenkreuz’ in Germany and ‘Tetraskelion’ or ‘Tetragammadion’ in Greece.

Even in the early twentieth century, the swastika was still a symbol with positive connotations.

For 3,000 years, the swastika meant life and good luck. But because of the Nazis, it has also taken on a meaning of death and hate

In the ancient Indian language of Sanskrit, swastika means «well-being». The symbol has been used by Hindus, Buddhists and Jains for millennia and is commonly assumed to be an Indian sign.

The Nazi use of the swastika stems from the work of 19th Century German scholars translating old Indian texts, who noticed similarities between their own language and Sanskrit. They concluded that Indians and Germans must have had a shared ancestry and imagined a race of white god-like warriors they called Aryans. German nationalist movements saw the swastika as the Germans’ link to the Aryan “master race” and a “symbol of ‘Aryan identity’ and German nationalist pride,” the Holocaust Museum says, and it soon “became associated with the idea of a racially ‘pure’ state.

Claude Monet: Born on this day in 1840

Standard

The name giver:

Monet painted the famous Impression, Sunrise (Impression, soleil levant) in 1872. It depicted a Le Havre port landscape. In 1874 it hung in the first Impressionist exhibition. Thanks to this painting the whole movement is now called “Impressionism” – The art critic who came up with this adjective meant his assessment to be negative, but the Impressionists at the time approved of description and it stuck.

The Gulf of Marseilles Seen from L’Estaque by Paul Cézanne 

Standard


Cézanne enthused about the fishing village of L’Estaque to Pissarro in 1876: «It is like a playing card. Red roofs over the blue sea. . . . The sun is so terrific here that it seems to me as if the objects were silhouetted not only in black and white, but in blue, red, brown, and violet.» Cézanne painted some twenty views of L’Estaque over the next decade, a dozen of them facing toward or across the gulf of Marseilles. In the distance of this painting, atop the hill to the right of the jetty, the towers of Notre-Dame-de-la-Garde stand watch over the city of Marseilles.

The Greek Sale, Bonhams 28/4/2015

Standard

Four of the paintings, among other works of art, that will be auctioned:

kazanoba

«Καζανόβα» έργο του Νίκοu Εγγονόπουλοu

koritsi-me-leuko-mantili

«Κορίτσι με λευκό μαντήλι», έργο του Νικολάου Γύζη.

louloudia-se-pilino-bazo

«Λουλούδια σε πήλινο βάζο», έργο του Γιάννη Τσαρούχη.

moon-over-wallmoon-with-mist

«Moon over wallMoon with mist», έργο του Νίκου Χατζηκυριάκου – Γκίκα.

See here: http://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22710/?department=PIC-GRE
Source: http://www.naftemporiki.gr/story/932604/i-elliniki-texni-dieurunei-tous-orizontes-tis

Bob Mazzer Underground (Howard Griffin Gallery 12 June – 13 July 2014)

Standard

14-Bob-Mazzer-Howard-Griffin-Gallery_856_560_80_s_c1_smart_scale
«Clockwell» 1980s

«Every day I travelled to King’s Cross and back. Coming home late at night, it was like a party and I felt like the tube was mine and I was there to take the pictures.» – Bob Mazzer.

While working as a projectionist in a porn cinema in Central London during the 1980s, Bob Mazzer began photographing on the tube during his daily commute, creating irresistably joyous pictures alive with humour and humanity. This photographic social history then remained unseen and unexhibited for years.

7-Bob-Mazzer-Howard-Griffin-Gallery_848_560_80_s_c1_smart_scale
«Trying to open doors» 1980s

16-Bob-Mazzer-Howard-Griffin-Gallery_855_560_80_s_c1_smart_scale
«Woman on Phone» 1980s

See more: http://howardgriffingallery.com/artists/bob-mazzer/