Vladimir Vladimirovich Mayakovsky { July 19, 1893-April 14, 1930 (aged 36)}

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Futurist_Mayakovsky

Photo, 1917 (sign: «Futurist Vladimir Mayakovsky»)

«The relevance of Mayakovsky’s influence cannot be limited to Soviet poetry. While for years he was considered the Soviet poet par excellence, he also changed the perceptions of poetry in wider 20th century culture. His political activism as a propagandistic agitator was rarely understood and often looked upon unfavourably by contemporaries, even close friends like Boris Pasternak.»

Mayakovsky_Pasternak

Mayakovsky (centre) with friends including Lilya Brik, Eisenstein (third from left) and Boris Pasternak (second from left).

Plakat_mayakowski_gross

Agitprop (meaning agitation propaganda from Russian agitatsiya propaganda) poster by Mayakovsky

Vladimir Mayakovsky 1917
Our March

Beat the squares with the tramp of rebels!
Higher, rangers of haughty heads!
We’ll wash the world with a second deluge,
Now’s the hour whose coming it dreads.
Too slow, the wagon of years,
The oxen of days — too glum.
Our god is the god of speed,
Our heart — our battle drum.
Is there a gold diviner than ours/
What wasp of a bullet us can sting?
Songs are our weapons, our power of powers,
Our gold — our voices — just hear us sing!
Meadow, lie green on the earth!
With silk our days for us line!
Rainbow, give color and girth
To the fleet-foot steeds of time.
The heavens grudge us their starry glamour.
Bah! Without it our songs can thrive.
Hey there, Ursus Major, clamour
For us to be taken to heaven alive!
Sing, of delight drink deep,
Drain spring by cups, not by thimbles.
Heart step up your beat!
Our breasts be the brass of cymbals.
(via http://www.marxists.org/subject/art/literature/mayakovsky/ read more poems)

Futurism

An avant-garde aesthetic movement that arose in Italy and Russia in the early 20th century. Its proponents—predominantly painters and other visual artists—called for a rejection of past forms of expression, and the embrace of industry and new technology. Speed and violence were the favored vehicles of sensation, rather than lyricism, symbolism, and “high” culture. F. T. Marinetti, in his futurist Manifesto (1909), advocated “words in freedom”—a language unbound by common syntax and order that, along with striking variations in typography, could quickly convey intense emotions. Marinetti and other Italian futurists allied themselves with militaristic nationalism, which alienated their cause internationally following World War II. Russian futurist poets such as Velimir Khlebnikov and Vladimir Mayakovsky profoundly influenced the development of Russian formalism, while in England the futurist movement was expressed as Vorticism by Ezra Pound and Wyndham Lewis in their magazine BLAST.

“Futurism and the New Manifesto” here:http://www.poetryfoundation.org/features/audioitem/1782

Vladimir Mayakovsky: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Mayakovsky